letting the good times roll

Since 1776

The 200 year long story of The Castle Hotel is woven not just into it's bricks and mortar, its Victorian tiles or its mosaic floors. It’s a feeling that you can’t put your finger on. It’s in its people. In its memories. And in the layers of history built up over centuries of experience.

The Castle Hotel started life in 1776, although records show that there has been a dwelling on the site since the 1400s. Over the course of a century the pub changed name several times, trading first as The Crown and Sceptre, then The Crown and Anchor and later The Clock Face. In the late nineteenth century the pub was acquired by Kay’s Atlas Brewery and started a new chapter as The Castle Hotel; which is probably when the current tiled façade and bar were added. In the early 1930s Frederic Robinson took over Kay’s Atlas Brewery and, consequently, The Castle Hotel.

The pub’s now deeply cemented relationship with the city’s music scene probably began when it was a stopping off point for people on their way to Band on the Wall.

In 1979, a now legendary John Peel interview with Ian Curtis took place here, weaving The Castle further into the fabric of Manchester’s musical heritage. Sadly, The Castle fell on hard times and closed it's doors in 2008. This cherished public house was not to remain closed for long though, and in 2009 friends Jonny Booth and Rupert Hill took over The Castle Hotel and set about bringing the decrepit building back to life.

After a period of restoration which saw the infamous leaky roof replaced and the pub’s entire interior sympathetically brought back in line with it's rich heritage, the renovation was completed in October 2010 with the grand unveiling of the new Music Hall and Theatre at In The City 2010.

So that’s the story so far. And now The Castle Hotel is ready for it's next chapter; one which will see this historical drinking house continue to evolve at the beating heart of Manchester’s creative communities. So come along, pull up a stool, and become a part of our story.

THE NORTHERN QUARTER'S ORIGINAL

Ale House

With ten cask handpulls, wide selection of craft and continental beers, the best jukebox in Manchester, literature and theatre events, emerging and breakthrough live music we’re your local in the heart of the city.

  • On Tap

    Tasting Notes: Robinson’s Unicorn (Stockport) 4.3%

    A magnificent pale tart and thirst quenching bitter beer full of rich malt and hops, complimented by the complex aromas of Golding hops giving a long dry finish with citrusy notes.

    The Unicorn Brewery rests over the foundations of the Unicorn public house, purchased in 1938 by William Robinson from Samuel Hole. By 1849 William had remarried leaving George, his oldest son to run the inn. At this time George started to brew the first Robinsons ale. William’s younger son Frederic took the helm from George in 1859.

    Unicorn
    Traditional Bitter
  • On Tap

    Tasting Notes: Robinson’s: Build A Rocket Boys (Stockport) 4.0%

    Band members sampled a range of Robinsons’ ales to shortlist their preferred style of beer, taste and colour before deciding on a golden ale with a rich rounded body, smooth bitterness, subtle tang of malt and fruity aroma. elbow’s ale is a premium session bitter.

    The Unicorn Brewery rests over the foundations of the Unicorn public house, purchased in 1938 by William Robinson from Samuel Hole. By 1849 William had remarried leaving George, his oldest son to run the inn. At this time George started to brew the first Robinsons ale. William’s younger son Frederic took the helm from George in 1859.

    Build
    Golden Ale
  • On Tap

    Tasting Notes: Cherry Valentine Presents The Midbeats

    with guests

  • On Tap

    Tasting Notes: Titanic Brewery: Iceberg (Stoke-on-Trent) 4.1%

    A combination of Maris Otter pale malt and fine wheat malt, give this refreshing beer real zest. Add fresh tasting Yakima Galena and Cascade hops and what you get is a fantastic wheat beer that will hole any passing thirst.

    Titanic Brewery was founded in Burslem Stoke on Trent in 1985. Burslem was the Mother town of the Potteries and had many great names who had started their careers amongst the bottle kilns and smoke. In Etruria just down the road Captain Edward John Smith was born. He would go on to command the world’s most famous liner. It is in honour of him that the brewery was named. 

    SONY DSC
    English wheat beer
  • On Tap

    Tasting Notes: Robinsons: Trooper (Stockport) 4.8%

    TROOPER is a deep golden ale with citric hop notes and dominating malt flavours with a subtle hint of lemon. Real depth of character with complex hop notes using a combination of Goldings, Bobec and Cascade Hops. Bruce Dickinson, Maiden’s vocalist, played a major role in developing the unique flavour of the beer.

    The Unicorn Brewery rests over the foundations of the Unicorn public house, purchased in 1938 by William Robinson from Samuel Hole. By 1849 William had remarried leaving George, his oldest son to run the inn. At this time George started to brew the first Robinsons ale. William’s younger son Frederic took the helm from George in 1859.

    SONY DSC
    Golden lemon and malt
  • On Tap

    Tasting Notes: Robinson’s Dizzy Blonde (Stockport) 3.8%

    This straw-coloured summer ale is brimming with distinctive herbal aromas. A light, refreshing beer, Dizzy Blonde has a clean, zesty, hop-dominated palate; complemented by a crisp, dry finish.

    The Unicorn Brewery rests over the foundations of the Unicorn public house, purchased in 1938 by William Robinson from Samuel Hole. By 1849 William had remarried leaving George, his oldest son to run the inn. At this time George started to brew the first Robinsons ale. William’s younger son Frederic took the helm from George in 1859.

    SONY DSC
    A Hazy Golden Beer
  • On Tap

    Tasting Notes: Weston’s: Old Rosie (Herefordshire) 7.3%

    Award winning Old Rosie is allowed to settle naturally after fermentation, resulting in a truly old-fashioned, full flavoured and cloudy scrumpy with a well balanced medium character. Suitable for vegetarians, vegans and coeliacs.

    old-rosie
    Medium Dry Cider
  • On Tap

    Tasting Notes: Hartley’s Brewery: Cumbria Way (Cumbria) 4.1%

    Named after the epic 70-mile amble across Lakeland, this full-bodied beer plays a spicy, fruity note on the nose, and a sweet, citrus tone on the taste buds. Topped off with a long, dry finish and a good bitterness level brought on by the Goldings hops.

    Based in The Old Brewery, brewing commenced in 1755. On the 17th July 1896, the Old Brewery was conveyed to Robert & John Hartley and on 29th December 1919 Hartley’s (Ulverston) Limited was incorporated. The company was acquired by Robinsons in 1982.

    SONY DSC
    Pale Golden Bitter

Our Events

View event guide as

  • image1

    Thu 18 December

    Glass Onion Presents Sittin’ Pretty

    with guests

    Sour Mash

    India Mill

    Alessa’s Nowhere

    Sat 20 December

    Brown Brogues

    Thu 15 January

    Dream Factory Presents Gorgeous Bully

    with guests

    Jaww

    Her’s

    Mike-Heron-Trembling-Bells-Gullivers

    Tue 27 January

    Hey! Manchester Presents Mike Heron and Trembling Bells

    with guests

    GWFM-logo-square

    Thu 29 January

    Great Weather For Media Spoken Word Extravaganza

    with special guests from Manchester and New York City

    Lost-Trasgos-Muertos-web

    Fri 6 February

    Hey! Manchester presents Los Trasgos Muertas

    with guests

    Barbados Slim

    Elle Mary & The Bad Men